BACKYARD BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA

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North American Garden Birds

General

How to attract

Nest aid

American Goldfinch

With the bright yellow summer dress, the male Gold Finches are some of the most conspicuous and prettiest North American backyard birds.

Thistle seeds in transparent plastic feeder

Birdhouse

American Robin

The ecological equivalent of the European Blackbird, the American robin is one of the most familiar North American garden birds.

 

Platform

Anna's Hummingbird

The Anna's Hummingbird is the only year-round hummingbird in the United States.

Hummingbird feeder

 

Baltimore Oriole

Yet another bright yellow male backyard bird is the Baltimore oriole. With it's black and ochre colors, it's a highly valued backyard bird at your bird feeder.

   

Black-Capped Chickadee

As one of the tamest backyard birds in North America, with patience you may even teach it to eat from your hand.

 

Birdhouse

Black-Headed Grosbeak

The less colorful black-headed grosbeak is still a very desirable backyard bird.

Birdfeeder table

 

Blue Jay

While Jays are known for some aggressive behavior, the Blue jays are relatively shy compared to other Jays, and with their blue and while feather decks they are among the most marveled backyard birds in North America.

Birdfeeder table

 

Bullock's Oriole

The Bullock's oriole is the western equivalent of the Baltimore oriole.

   

Carolina Wren

The Carolina wren, has an extravagant melodious song.

Birdfeeder table

Birdhouse

Cedar Waxwing

Waxwings  are some of the most sophisticated looking birds in Eurasia. It is always a thrill to see them feeding on berry-bearing trees.

   

Dark-Eyed Junco

The dark-eyed junco is a quiet but very common garden visitor throughout North America.

Birdfeeder table

 

Downy Woodpecker

The downy woodpecker is one of the most common backyard birds in North America.

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

Eastern Bluebird

This bright blue beaty won't come to any bird feeder but you can attract it with birdhouses along the edges of openings among the woods.

 

Birdhouse

Eastern Phoebe

A true insect feeder along Easter North America, you won't attract this garden bird with any measures, but it may find its way to your garden just on its own.

   

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhees are backyard birds that love to visit your birdfeeder.

   

Evening Grosbeak

Evening grosbeaks wintering birds who love to pay a visit to your birdfeeder.

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird  are great mimicking other birds as well as electronic sounds such as telephones.

   

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a bit larger than the Downy Woodpecker and equally familiar in garders and on birdfeeders.

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

House Finch

 

Birdfeeder table

 

House Wren

The House wren is one of the most common birds in North America, that builds its nests in many nooks and crannies along your house and in your garden, such as gutters, woodpiles, birdhouses, etc.

Birdfeeder table

Birdhouse

Indigo Bunting

The royal blue bird is a crown jewel in your backyard.

Birdfeeder table

 

Killdeer

Originally a wader, Killdeer have become increasingly common birds on urban lawns in North America.

   

Mallard

Mallard chicks are some of the most endearing creatures for little children, but you don't want Mallard Ducks in your backyard pond or birdbath. It plows up the entire pond, eating your water plants, eutrophiating your water with its droppings.

   

Mountain Bluebird

Mountain Bluebirds are the western equivalents of the Eastern Bluebirds.

   

Mourning Dove

The cooing of Mourning Doves give a wonderful feeling of peacefulness to your garden. They may be a bit greedy though on your birdfeeder, as the can stuff great amount of seeds, while chasing away many less assertive garden birds.

Birdfeeder table

 

Northern Cardinal

The bright red males of the Northern Cardinal are some of the most popular birds of North America and very common on birdfeeders.

Birdfeeder table

 

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a shy but faithful user of your birdfeeder.

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

Northern Mockingbird

No other bird knows how to mimic songs and mechanical sounds like the Northern Mockingbird.

   

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpeckers are insectivores and among the largest woodpeckers in the world. Fascinating but shy in nature they will watch you from behind a tree and when they think you are not looking back they may dart onto your birdfeeder and hawkup sunflower seeds like any seedeater. They love seed in grease tablets.

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

Pine Siskin

Pine siskins love feeding our your from your thistle seed feeder.

Birdfeeder table

 

Purple Finch

Purple Finches are common backyard birds frequenting birdfeeders.

Birdfeeder table

 

Purple Martin

     

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Red-Bellied Woodpeckers are frequent backyard visitors.

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

Rose-Breasted Grosbeak

 

Birdfeeder table

 

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

The only hummingbird in the East, the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird is a much beloved visitor of your garden where it feeds on hummingbird feeders and flowers alike.

Hummingbird feeder

 

Rufous Hummingbird

Viciously territorial, Rufous Hummingbirds dart after each other while competing for a zip from your hummingbird feeder.

Hummingbird feeder

 

Scarlet Tanager

A very colorful garden bird is the Scarlet Tanager, a crown jewel to your garden.

Birdfeeder table

 

Screech-Owl

The screech-owl is a very common owl in wooded neighborhoods.

No feeding measures possible

owl house

Song Sparrow

     

Spotted Towhee

     

Tree Swallow

Tree swallows rest on the telephone and power lines that feed into your house.

   

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted titmice are common visitors of your birdfeeder.

 

Birdhouse

Western Scrub-Jay

Western Scrub-Jays are extremely tame garden birds in the West and some can be tought to eat out of your hand.

Birdfeeder table

 

Western Tanager

It might only fly in the West, but the western tanager is still a favorite among bird-watchers all over the United States. Learn how to attract the western tanager to your backyard, and listen to its song.

   

White-Breasted Nuthatch

Like all Nuthatches, the White-breasted Nuthatch can crawl down a tree with its head down. They are common visitors of birdfeeders. 

Birdfeeder table, suet grease blocks

 

White-Throated Sparrow

     

Wood Duck

As their name says, Wood Ducks nest in hollow trees and are fond of nest boxes.

 

Birdhouse

Wood Thrush

The wood thrush is a lovely insect eater in your backyard.

   

Yellow Warbler

The yellow warbler has one of the sweetest songs of all birds in North America. Learn how to attract yellow warblers to your backyard, and listen to their song.

   
 
 

Dimensions of Birdhouses or Nest Boxes for North American Backyard Birds

Bird Species

Floor Size

Height

Entrance Height

Hole Diameter

Height Above Ground

American Robin *

7 x 8

8

-

-

6 - 15

Ash Throated Flycatcher

6 x 6

8 - 12

6 - 10

1 1/2

5 - 15

Barred Owl

12 x 12

23

12

3 1/2

10 - 30

Barn Owl

10 x 18

15 - 18

4

6

12 - 18

Barn Swallow*

6 x 6

6

-

-

8 - 12

Bewick's Wren

4 x 4

6 - 8

4 - 6

1 - 1 1/4

6 - 10

Black-capped, Carolina Mountain & Boreal Chickadees

4 x 4

 

9

1 1/4

 

 

Brown Creeper

4 x 4

8

 

1 3/8

 

Brown-headed, Pygmy & Red-breasted Nuthatch

4x4

8-10

1 1/4

6-8

5-15

Carolina Wren

4 x 4

6 - 8

4 - 6

1 1/2

6 - 10

Chestnut Backed & Siberian Chickadee, Brown-headed & Pygmy Nuthatch

4 X 4

8 - 10

6 - 8

1 1/8

6 - 15

Common & Northern Flicker

7 X 7

16 - 18

14 - 16

2 1/2

6 - 20

Crested Flycatcher

6 X 6

8 - 10

6 - 8

2

8 - 20

Downey Woodpecker

4 x 4

8 - 10

6 - 8

1 1/4

5 - 15

Eastern & Western Blue Bird

5 x 5

8 - 12

6 - 10

1 1/2

4 - 6

Golden-fronted

6 X 6

12 - 15

9 - 12

2

12 - 20

Great Creasted Flycatcher

6 x 6

8 - 12

6 - 10

1 3/4

5 - 15

House Finch

6 X 6

6

4

2

8 - 12

House wrens

4x4

6-8

4-6

1-1/4

6-10

Lewis's Woodpecker

7x7

16-18

14-16

2-1/2

12-20

Mtn Blue Bird

 

5x5

6-12

1 9/16

4-10

Northern  Flicker

7x7

16-18

14-16

2-1/2

6-20

Nuthatch

4 X 4

8 - 10

6 - 8

1 1/4

12 - 20

Osprey*

48 x 48

 

 

 

 

Phoebes*

6 x 6

6

-

-

8 - 12

Pileated Woodpecker

8 x 8

16 - 24

12 - 20

3 - 4

15 - 25

Prothonotary Warbler  

5" x 5"

6"

4-5"

1 1/8"

4-8'

Purple Martin

6 X 6

6

1

Special

15 - 20

Red-Headed
 Woodpecker

6x6

12-15

9-12

2

10-20

Red-Tailed Hawk and Great Horned Owl *

24 x 24

 

 

 

 

Saw-Whet Owl

6 X 6

10 - 12

8 - 10

2 1/2

12 - 20

Screech Owl and Kestrel

8 X 8

12 - 15

9 - 12

3

10 - 30

Sparrow Hawk

8 X 8

12 - 15

9 - 12

3

10 - 30

Starling

6 X 6

16 - 18

14 - 16

2

10 - 25

Swallow

5 X 5

6

1 - 5

1 1/2

10 - 15

Titmouse

4 X 4

8 - 10

6 - 8

1 1/4

6 - 15

Tree and Violet Green Swallow

5 x 5

6 - 8

4 - 6

1 1/2

5 - 15

Tufted & Plain Titmouse

4 x 4

10 - 12

6 - 10

1 1/4

5 - 15

Warbler

5x5

6

4-5

1-1/8

4-8

White-breasted & Red-breasted Nuthatch  

4x4

8-10

6-8

1-3/8

5-15

Wood Duck

10 X 18

10 - 24

12 - 16

4

10 - 20

Wren

4 X 4

6 - 8

4 - 6

1 1/4

6 - 10

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker

5 x 5

12 - 15

9 - 12

1 1/2

10 - 20

 

On this website, you can find the bird Check lists of all countries of the world: Just go to https://www.birdlist.org/site/regions.htm. In many of them you can find the bird names in its native language as well. But there is much more. There are pictures of nature, great tools for conservation, information on national parks and other nature reserves, an on-line book on ecology and nature conservation, free software for downloading, technical reports for those who want it. In order to find your way through the 2000 interlinked web pages on nature and conservation, please go to the site map. Thank you for visiting our web page on backyard birds of North America.

 
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